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Posts for tag: winter haven

Here at CFFA we specialize in foot and ankle fractures and we know exactly what to do to get people better under optimal conditions.

We offer minimally invasive and noninvasive procedures as well as surgery. 

This is not the first injury Neymar sustained in the past 12 months . His fifth metatarsal fracture required surgery last year making him miss one of the most important matches of the season.

Once the bone heals up, even in the best case scenario, after the surgery and plates and screws are replaced, the bone never heals with 100% strength therefore making people more prone to reinjury and future fractures.

Due to the high impact nature of soccer, reinjury is more likely.

Once reinjury occurs, we try not to perform surgery the 2nd time as there is a higher chance for avascular necrosis process which means that the bone does not get adequate blood perfusion and can necrose and die.

If I have to make an educated guess, I would guess that his fifth metatarsal fracture this time is in the neck of the fifth metatarsal making it more likely to heal on its own without surgical intervention.

Fractures take approximately 4–6 weeks to heal. But it takes 10 to 12 weeks for an athlete to feel confident to return back to physical activity. 

If you experience any foot pain or problems call us today so we can help. 

Dr. Tatiana Wellens, DPM, PhD
Central Florida Foot and Ankle, LLC

It appears, her injury is due to the osteochondral lesion in her foot.

I do see those type of injuries quite often, they’re usually due to the overuse or over training. Tailor dome injuries and osteochondral lesions are common in dancers and other athletes and usually are treated with complete immobilization and if misdiagnosed can be devastating. I also see those commonly associated with severe ankle sprains.

I also advise patients who have ankle sprains to seek medical attention right away as you want to have a proper diagnosis and treatment immediately. I see a lot of patients who do not get treated by a professional and end up with chronic ankle pain and ankle instability.

Of course, since I am not a physician who treated Madison, I am not sure if this is what she had. There are 33 joints and 27 bones in the foot and ankle. Therefore, there are many bones that can possibly be affected.

The other common osteochondral lesion side is the second metatarsal, Fracture of the Carthage. It can be seen and is as called Freiberg’s in fraction. It is essential to seek medical attention and proper diagnosis and treatment. Of course, with her, being an Olympic athlete, it is not uncommon to experience reinjury.  

Dr. Tatiana Wellens, DPM, PhD
Central Florida Foot and Ankle Center, LLC

Very unfortunate but also devastating injury for Mr. Canaan. From just assessing the picture, he definitely needs surgery right away. Sometimes surgeons have to wait for several days prior to the surgery to help with swelling.

Even though I have not seen the x-rays, most likely we’re dealing with Bimalleoli ankle fracture which means that both fibula and tibia which are the two main bones of the lower leg are broken and displaced.

Usually that requires either placing an external fixation frame on the ankle or using screws and plates to put the fracture back together to realign the joint. Fractures of the talus can also be present as well as multiple ligament injuries.

After the surgery, he will be nonweightbearing for six weeks and will require extensive physical therapy to prevent arthritis in his ankle. He will probably return to normal activity within the next 6 to 9 months but osteoarthritis is very common. 

At Central Florida foot and  ankle we treat everything, from most simple conditions to devastating injuries like this.

Dr. Tatiana Wellens, DPM, PhD

Hyeon Chung defended his decision to retire in the second set of the Australian Open semi-final against Roger Federer after succumbing to the pain of a badly blistered "red raw" foot.

This is a truly disturbing picture that shows that the blister in this tennis player had ruptured and he has an infection. The wound is deep to subcutaneous tissue. Usually, it is very painful unless patient is diabetic and has neuropathy. It was probably caused by the friction of the shoe or the tape that was put on too tight. Bottom line, if I was his physician, I would advise him to stop playing immediately and take the pressure completely off his foot. He will also need to go on very strong antibiotics, starting with intravenous antibiotics and progressively transitioning to oral antibiotics.

Obviously, this is not common in weekend athletes or recreational athletes, but this situation is very common in diabetics. Due to diabetes, patients do not have normal feeling on the bottom of their foot therefore a blister cannot be felt until it gets deeply infected.

When a ruptured infected blister or a wound is present in the foot, we are concerned about circulation. In general, feet do not have a lot of soft tissue coverage and there is not a lot of space between skin and bone and bone infections (osteomyelitis) are very common.

Do not delay your care, a couple of days can be a difference between simple oral antibiotics and six weeks of intravenous antibiotics and hospital admission.