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Posts for tag: anterior talofibular ligament

Daniel Craig will undergo ankle surgery after sustaining an injury while filming “Bond 25.”

“Daniel Craig will be undergoing minor ankle surgery resulting from an injury sustained during filming in Jamaica,” the franchise’s official Twitter account posted. “Production will continue whilst Craig is rehabilitating for two weeks post-surgery. The film remains on track for the same release date in April 2020.”

According to the Sun, the actor fell earlier this month while sprinting on the set of the latest James Bond film.

“He was sprinting during filming when he slipped and fell quite awkwardly,” a source told the British tabloid. “He was in quite a lot of pain and was complaining about his ankle.”

According to the information that is provided in the press, most likely he has a tear of the anterior talofibular ligament or the tear of peroneal tendon or both. In my opinion, if you had an ankle fracture, it would take more than 2 to 3 weeks for him to return back on the set. 

At CFFA we treat these type of injuries surgically and nonsurgically all the time. Sometimes in situations like this, for a very active athletic person it makes more sense to undergo surgery almost immediately because they will recuperate faster. In the more sedentary people, we recommend 4 to 6 months of non-surgical treatment first

Dr. Tatiana Wellens, DPM, PhD

It appears that Tony injured his anterior talofibular ligament when he twisted his ankle. Hopefully x-rays were obtained to be sure he does not have a fibula fracture just a type of an ankle fracture. MRI is the most accurate diagnostic tool for this type of injury.

Since he says in his post he’s feeling optimistic I’m guessing that it’s either a grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain which usually is uncomfortable but does not prevent golfers from competing.

It is treated with rest, ice, compression and elevation and usually does not have a new long-term repercussion.

Looking at the video it looks like it’s not the first time he had this ankle injury if it took him no time but to pop it back in place , that probably demonstrates that it’s more of a chronic lateral ankle instability which is basically injury to the anterior talofibular ligament over and over again. Basically, ligaments become so lax that it’s much easier to dislocate the ankle. Ankle stabilization surgery is the only way to permanently fix the problem..... and guess what? We do it at CFFA!!!!

Dr. Tatiana Wellens, DPM, PhD