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Posts for tag: ankle injury

Image result for andrew luck injuryLate Tuesday night, Indianapolis Colts general manager Chris Ballard conducted a  news teleconference in hopes of clearing up the mystery surrounding star quarterback Andrew Luck's long lingering left leg injury. 

Ballard admitted that while Luck's medical team once believed the quarterback was solely dealing with a calf injury, they recently discovered he was also dealing with an ankle injury as well. 

They thought at first that the injury might have something to do with the os trigonum, a small, back-of-the-ankle bone that most humans don't even have. While Luck indeed has the rare and useless bone, a recent test has led them to believe it is not the source of Luck's issues. 

Instead, they believe Luck is dealing with an issue at the front of his ankle, high in the joint, that has been causing pain in his calf and lower leg, above the Achilles tendon. 

Syndesmosis is a pretty rare injury and we only usually see it in high impact sports like football. But os trigonum (The condition they originally thought he had) is a more common issue that usually presents with pain in the back of the ankle especially with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. It is mostly seen in tennis players and dancers.

We see a wide range of injuries here at CFFA including these. We have conservative approaches to treat these type injuries and if those don't work we perform the proper surgery if needed.

Call us today for more information. 

Dr. Tatiana Wellens, DPM, PhD
Central Florida Foot and Ankle, LLC

It appears that Tony injured his anterior talofibular ligament when he twisted his ankle. Hopefully x-rays were obtained to be sure he does not have a fibula fracture just a type of an ankle fracture. MRI is the most accurate diagnostic tool for this type of injury.

Since he says in his post he’s feeling optimistic I’m guessing that it’s either a grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain which usually is uncomfortable but does not prevent golfers from competing.

It is treated with rest, ice, compression and elevation and usually does not have a new long-term repercussion.

Looking at the video it looks like it’s not the first time he had this ankle injury if it took him no time but to pop it back in place , that probably demonstrates that it’s more of a chronic lateral ankle instability which is basically injury to the anterior talofibular ligament over and over again. Basically, ligaments become so lax that it’s much easier to dislocate the ankle. Ankle stabilization surgery is the only way to permanently fix the problem..... and guess what? We do it at CFFA!!!!

Dr. Tatiana Wellens, DPM, PhD